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Challenging new projects. Creative yet practical solutions. Innovative ways to protect the planet – one property at a time. Catch up on the latest news from Cooperstown Environmental here.

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Installation at Shaheen Bros. in Amesbury

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Installation  at Shaheen Bros. in Amesbury
ANDOVER, MA – Cooperstown Environmental LLC announced that it has completed a 385-kW rooftop solar photovoltaic installation at 95 Haverhill Road in Amesbury, Massachusetts. The installation is complete and the system was placed in service on September 30, 2016. The panels are expected to produce more than 450,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year of clean, renewable energy – enough to power about 60 average Massachusetts homes. The system consists of 1,185 Trina Solar 325-watt photovoltaic panels, nine Solectria inverters, and a mounting system furnished by Ecolibrium. Cooperstown’s client was SBI Solar LLC, the system owner, which has signed a Power Purchase

Future of Solar Energy in Massachusetts is Cloudy

Future of Solar Energy in Massachusetts is Cloudy
The solar photovoltaic energy market in Massachusetts is in disarray due to uncertainty in both the Solar Carve-Out II Program, better known as SREC II, and the net metering program. For both programs, the capacity limits set by the state have apparently been reached in part or in whole. Over the coming days, greater clarity is expected at least for the SREC program. As explained in an earlier article, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) announced on February 5, 2016 that applications had been received that exceed the capacity of the SREC II program capacity for systems larger than

Uh-oh! Massachusetts Solar Carve-Out II Program (SREC II) is full!

Uh-oh! Massachusetts Solar Carve-Out II Program (SREC II) is full!
In a shocking and potentially disastrous announcement on Friday, February 5, 2016, Michael Judge, the Director, Renewable and Alternative Energy at the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER), explained that the full capacity of the Massachusetts Solar Carve-Out II Program (better known as SREC II) may have been reached for projects larger than 25 kW DC. Specifically, “DOER has qualified or received applications for over 854 MW DC of capacity” exceeding the program limit of 660.595 MW for such projects. If DOER’s reviews confirm that the program is full, new commercial solar projects in Massachusetts, already suffering under the severe

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Installations on Two Reading Cooperative Bank Branches

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Installations on Two Reading Cooperative Bank Branches
Cooperstown Environmental LLC announced that it has completed rooftop solar photovoltaic installations on two Reading Cooperative Bank branches in North Reading and Wilmington, Massachusetts. With a placed in service date of November 2015, the systems are already producing clean, renewable energy – a projected 45,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year. Cooperstown’s client was Park Middlesex LLC, the owner of the buildings. Reading Coop operates a bank branch at each location under long-term leases. The power produced by the rooftop solar PV arrays will be used on-site and is expected to provide approximately one-third of the electric power used at the properties.

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Project

Cooperstown Environmental Completes Solar Project
Cooperstown Environmental LLC announced that it has completed the installation of a rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) installation in Quincy, Massachusetts. With a placed in service date of November 15th, 2012, the system is producing clean, renewable energy – a projected 135,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year. Fallon Ambulance is the host and will purchase electricity for its own use under a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with HOF Solar LLC, the system owner. Fallon will save a significant percentage of its annual energy costs under the deal as well as taking responsibility for approximately one-quarter of its annual electric load. Cooperstown Environmental