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Challenging new projects. Creative yet practical solutions. Innovative ways to protect the planet – one property at a time. Catch up on the latest news from Cooperstown Environmental here.

Part 3: What LSPs need to know about Indoor Air AEPMMs

Part 3: What LSPs need to know about Indoor Air AEPMMs
As LSPs, we have all been there: your client’s site has an indoor air issue and you need a sub-slab depressurization system (SSDS), maybe it will need remote telemetry, or maybe it will pass a risk assessment. You want to call your local radon contractor to install the SSDS, like you have in the past, but you’re not sure that the system will be in compliance with the recent changes to the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) if telemetry is needed. You should know, telemetry or not, there are important differences between radon systems and MCP vapor intrusion systems that mitigate

Part 2: What do property owners need to know about indoor air AEPMMs?

Part 2: What do property owners need to know about indoor air AEPMMs?
There are multiple stages to installing an Active Exposure Pathway Mitigation Measure (AEPMM) to mitigate vapor intrusion conditions: engineering, installation, and maintenance. When looking to install an AEPMM to manage indoor air quality at your property, whether commercial or residential, we recommend choosing a company that has years of experience in all three areas of this process. A properly designed AEPMM will rely on data that is collected at your property; as not all buildings or sub-surfaces are the same, and transmissivity conditions are project specific.  The system’s main component, the blower(s), should be sized based on not only sub-slab

What is an Active Exposure Pathway Mitigation Measure (AEPMM)?

As we discussed in a previous blog post, recent changes to the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) have enabled sites with an active exposure pathway mitigation measure (AEPMM) to achieve a Permanent Solution with Conditions (PSC). They can also be used with Immediate Response Actions (IRAs), Release Abatement Measures (RAMs), Temporary Solutions, and in conjunction with a Remedy Operation Status (ROS). But what exactly is an AEPMM anyway? The term AEPMM covers any mechanical system that is used to prevent human exposure to “released” chemicals that are present at a Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) site above established health risk thresholds. Most

Cooperstown Participates in Outreach and Education Initiative

Isaac Anderson, a Project Manager at Cooperstown, recently participated in the Licensed Site Professional Association’s (LSPA) outreach and education initiative aimed at informing local health officials about environmental cleanups and the MCP. Isaac, along with LSPA Board Member Cosmo Gallinaro, presented "Case Study of a Hazardous Waste Site Cleanup" at the Massachusetts Association of Health Boards Certificate Program in Taunton on November 5th, 2016. An additional presentation was made by Mike Penzo, LSP, LSPA President and Marilyn Wade, LSP, LSPA President Elect on November 12, 2016. This is the second year in a row in which representatives of the LSPA

The Importance of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA)

The Importance of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA)
When it comes to environmental contamination of real estate, the legal principle of “you break it, you buy it” does not apply – in fact, the reality is much worse! Under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) legislation (commonly known as Superfund), as well as state laws like Massachusetts’ C. 21E, legal liability for environmental contamination is “strict.” This means that the property owner is per se responsible for any contamination at that property - period. It does not matter if the owner caused or contributed to the contamination. It does not matter if the contamination

Why Is Everyone Talking About Sub Slab Depressurization Systems (SSD Systems) “Part 2”

Why Is Everyone Talking About Sub Slab Depressurization Systems (SSD Systems) “Part 2”
What You Need to Know: Telemetry for Sub Slab Depressurization Systems Our last SSDS blog post described vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the role that sub slab depressurization systems (SSD systems or SSDS) are taking in maintaining safe conditions for building occupants. Vapor intrusion occurs when vapors from VOCs in soil or groundwater enter a building through cracks, holes, or other penetrations in the foundation. Inhalation of these vapors can be detrimental to the health of building occupants, sometimes even in the short term. The Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) establishes the requirements for the identification and remediation

Why Is Everyone Talking About Sub Slab Depressurization Systems (SSD Systems)?

Why Is Everyone Talking About Sub Slab Depressurization Systems (SSD Systems)?
Introduction – Why Sub Slab Depressurization is the “new big thing.” Environmental contamination of soil and groundwater is an unfortunate but common fact. Releases of oil and hazardous materials from spills, tank leaks, past industrial disposal practices, or accidents have resulted in conditions that potentially can affect the health of residents and workers. Whether you are near a gasoline station, a dry cleaner, a Brownfield site, or even a residential site, these releases have the potential to impact your indoor environment. Vapor intrusion occurs when vapors from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil or groundwater enter a building through cracks,

Changes Coming to Telemetry Registration Process in the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP)

Changes Coming to Telemetry Registration Process in the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP)
Sub slab depressurization systems (SSD Systems or SSDSs) in Massachusetts require telemetry systems to communicate with system owners and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). This requirement is relatively new (2014) and MassDEP has been working cooperatively with the Licensed Site Professional Association (LSPA) to ensure that the regulations are effective, workable, and compliant. Cooperstown Environmental LLC is helping to lead the way in developing these new rules. Last fall, Isaac Anderson of Cooperstown Environmental LLC, working through the LSPA Technical Practices Committee and in conjunction with MassDEP, created and distributed a survey to LSPs. The purpose of the

Cooperstown Presents LSPA Telemetry Survey Results to DEP Advisory Committee

Cooperstown Presents LSPA Telemetry Survey Results to DEP Advisory Committee
As LSPs, we know that keeping track of policy changes is critical. Luckily for Cooperstown, our Project Manager Isaac Anderson co-chairs the Licensed Site Professional Association (LSPA) Technical Practice Committee (TPC), a committee dedicated to keeping up with the latest advancements in the practice. Currently the TPC is partnering with MassDEP to streamline the telemetry reporting process for practitioners. Through this partnership, Mr. Anderson was involved with conducting a survey to evaluate how LSPs are currently using telemetry in response to recent changes to the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP). Mr. Anderson gave a presentation of the results of the survey at

Remediation Expert Isaac Anderson Joins Firm

Remediation Expert Isaac Anderson Joins Firm
Cooperstown Environmental is pleased to announce that Isaac W. Anderson has joined the company as a Project Manager. He has a strong background in remediation project design and management, and has substantial experience in implementing systems to address petroleum and chlorinated solvent releases. He is skilled in groundwater remediation projects, chemical injection technology, soil vapor extraction, and sub-slab depressurization systems. He has developed specialized expertise in remote telemetry systems, now required by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for certain contaminated sites. Isaac is heavily involved in professional development activities, where he has taken leadership roles. Currently, he is co-chair of